Can you describe your research using only the 1,000 most common words?

Posted: January 25, 2013 in Science Communication

Describe your research using only the 1,000 most common words here: http://splasho.com/upgoer5/. Don’t use the cheats, they make it way way too easy!

What I would normally say:
I study how adolescent alcohol intake affects decision making, risk taking, and dopamine neurochemistry during adulthood.
Here is what I came up with:
I study how getting drunk when you are young changes your brain. Also how getting drunk when you are young changes how you think about things when you are older.
Its harder than you would think! Science isn’t even an option!
Let me know what you come up with! Good luck!
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Comments
  1. David Ashlin says:

    http://blogs.nature.com/soapboxscience/2013/01/23/opportunity-knocks-with-the-what-is-a-germ-challenge?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureBlogs&utm_source=buffer&
    buffer_share=94e66
    There’s another new science outreach challenge for practitioners to learn the much needed skill of how to present their work to the public. It was inspired by Alan Alda’s “Flame Challenge”.

    “So why is participation in outreach still lagging? I feel that it’s not that scientists don’t want to participate; it’s that they don’t have the time and resources to organize, develop or even actively seek out these activities. That is where I come in. As the Public Outreach Coordinator for the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), my job is to get scientists involved in outreach and science communication activities by lowering the activation energy for their participation. ”

    Can’t say I’ve ever read or heard anyone describing their role as that of an enzyme.

  2. Thanks for sharing the info for ASBMB’s challenge, I will be sure to pass this along. What the author writes regarding the increasing opportunities to communicate science to the general public is very true. That being said, I also think its true that scientists need to WANT to communicate to the general public, and sadly many of them don’t. This is why I am happy every time I hear whispers about the NIH (and other science funding agencies) beginning to require outreach and/or communication as part of grant funding. While many scientists will claim they don’t have time to participate in things like outreach efforts, I think they will figure out a way to make time if there is grant money attached! Its sad it has to come to tying money to these efforts, but hopefully once scientists see how fun outreach and communication efforts are, they will begin to do these activities willingly.

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